Published On: Sat, Aug 9th, 2014

Young Cherokee Central Schools artists showcased at reception

A reception was held for budding young artists from Cherokee Central School at Qualla Arts and Crafts on Tuesday, Aug. 5.  Shown (left-right) front row – Tivan Saunooke, Lauren Luther, Kalista Luther, Carl Ray McCoy, Arioyonna Jade Hill-Maney; back row – Dylan Woodard, Wyatt Woodard, Jaia Watty, Devy George, Tierney Bradley, Jalee Panther, Mary Ann Driver, Louise Goings – Basketry instructor, and Dorine George – Pottery assistant instructor.  (CCS photo)

A reception was held for budding young artists from Cherokee Central Schools at Qualla Arts and Crafts on Tuesday, Aug. 5. Shown (left-right) front row – Tivan Saunooke, Lauren Luther, Kalista Luther, Carl Ray McCoy, Arioyonna Jade Hill-Maney; back row – Dylan Woodard, Wyatt Woodard, Jaia Watty, Devy George, Tierney Bradley, Jalee Panther, Mary Ann Driver, Louise Goings – Basketry instructor, and Dorine George – Pottery assistant instructor. (CCS photo)

A reception was held for budding young artists from Cherokee Central Schools at Qualla Arts and Crafts on Tuesday, Aug. 5.

These artists were selected by Master Artists in Basketry, Louise  and Ed Goings; the  Master Artists in Pottery were Dean Reed and Dorine George.  The students were selected by the Master Artists based on creativity, willingness to learn, interest in Cherokee Culture, and excellent work habits in previous craft classes.   The Young Artists were Braylon Arch, Tierney Bradley, Mary Ann Driver, Deliah Esquivel, Devy George, A.J. Maney, Chloe and Isabel Lambert, Acecia Lambert, Lauren Luther, Kalista Luther, Carl Ray McCoy, Jalee Panther, Tivan Saunooke, Zayne Taylor, Jaia Watty, Dylan Woodard, and Wyatt Woodard.

At the reception, School Board member T.W. Saunooke commented, “The students were to be commended and that this was a vital part of the student’s education and the art show was a very important activity in the community.

He went on to say “This is culture and this is about us (as the Cherokee People).”

Annette Clapsaddle, Cherokee Preservation Foundation executive direction, stated, “It was great to see the young artists being recognized and it was also important to see the Qualla Arts and Crafts partnering with Cherokee Central Schools. This Young Artist Showcase is an important step in recognizing the artists of the future.”

Vickie Cruz, Qualla Arts and Crafts Mutual manager, also commented it was important for our young people to be recognized for their talents.  She stated, “We have talented childen in our community and we need to recognize them at a very early stage.”

Laura Pinnix, Cherokee Central Schools director of culture, appreciates the efforts of the parents and students.  These cultural activities took place after school and on Saturdays.  She gives special recognition to the instruction given by the Master Artists.  The Young Artist Program was sponsored by the Cherokee Preservation Foundation.

– Cherokee Central Schools

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