Published On: Tue, Oct 22nd, 2013
Sports | By

Tribal member competing for Miss Indian Rodeo

Devalyn Raylene Crowe, an EBCI tribal member and Yakama Nation descendant, is competing for the title of Miss Indian Rodeo at the National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas on Nov. 5-9. (Photos courtesy of Michelle Trevino)

Devalyn Raylene Crowe, an EBCI tribal member and Yakama Nation descendant, is competing for the title of Miss Indian Rodeo at the National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas on Nov. 5-9. (Photos courtesy of Michelle Trevino)

By SCOTT MCKIE B.P.

ONE FEATHER STAFF

 

Devalyn Raylene Crowe, an EBCI tribal member, will compete for the title of Miss Indian Rodeo at the Indian National Finals Rodeo (INFR) in Las Vegas, Nev. on Nov. 5-9.

“Rodeo is a big part of my life,” said Crowe who resides in Washington state and is also a Yakama Nation descendant.  “I’ve been raised around it since I was little, watching family and friends participate until I reached the age where I could start to rodeo…I have met many friends along the way in this sport of rodeo, and that’s what I love.”

Crowe is shown in her traditional Yakama dress.

Crowe is shown in her traditional Yakama dress.

Crowe, 18, is currently attending Yakima Valley Community College where she will study physical therapy with the goal to eventually join the Justin Sports Medicine Team.

In rodeo, she currently participates in barrel racing and is learning to do breakaway roping.  As a junior, she participated in barrel racing, pole bending, goat tying, cow riding, wild horse racing, and has even tried bull riding.

She has held several rodeo queen titles previously including the 2011 Toppenish Jr. Rodeo Queen and Royalty Representative for White Swan Jr. Rodeo and the Jr. Queen for the Veteran’s Day Celebration in White Swan.

Crowe is shown riding her first junior bull at the Pi-Ume-Sha Rodeo in Warm Springs, OR.

Crowe is shown riding her first junior bull at the Pi-Ume-Sha Rodeo in Warm Springs, OR.

When asked what winning the title of Miss Indian Rodeo would mean to her, she replied, “It would mean the world to me because it would be another goal reached in my book.  It also would mean a lot to me because it would give me a chance to rodeo and represent INFR to the best of my abilities.  Not only will I do my best, but I will be able to meet new people and go to place I’ve never been throughout my reign.”

She is the daughter of Michelle Trevino and step-father Richard Trevino and Billy Frazier and step-mother Jackie Frazier.  Her maternal grandfather is Mike Crowe from Cherokee and her maternal great-grandparents are Katie Jessian and the late John Jessian of Cherokee.

For more information on the National Indian Finals Rodeo, visit www.infr.org.

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