Published On: Mon, Sep 23rd, 2013

Crowe, Jackson to vie for Miss Cherokee title

By SCOTT MCKIE B.P.

ONE FEATHER STAFF

 

The new Miss Cherokee will be a Brave and a Lion.  That much is guaranteed.

Paige Jackson and Madison Crowe are vying for the title of MIss Cherokee at the pageant scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 28 at 6pm at the Chief Joyce Dugan Cultural Arts Center.  (SCOTT MCKIE B.P./One Feather)

Paige Jackson and Madison Crowe are vying for the title of MIss Cherokee at the pageant scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 28 at 6pm at the Chief Joyce Dugan Cultural Arts Center. (SCOTT MCKIE B.P./One Feather)

Madison Crowe and Paige Jackson, both 2011 graduates of Cherokee High School and students at Mars Hill University, are vying for the title of Miss Cherokee 2013 at the pageant scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 28 at 6pm at the Chief Joyce Dugan Cultural Arts Center.

Crowe, 20, is the daughter of Peanut and Radonna Crowe of the Wolfetown Community.  She is a junior at Mars Hill majoring in art therapy and art education.  She is a member of the Mars Hill cheerleading squad, a member of the Delta Zeta sorority, and is a co-founder of the Native American Student Association.  Crowe has been listed on the dean’s list and is a psychology tutor.  Her hobbies include oil painting, drawing and basketry.

“We’re kind of lacking in role models now,” said Crowe, “and I feel like with Miss Cherokee, I wouldn’t want it for the crown or the title or anything, but to be able to show kids that it’s ok to succeed.  I would like to use the crown as a tool to be able to talk to people and encourage them.”

She went on to say, “You can do whatever you want to do, I know as I’ve done it.  I just want to send everyone the impression that you can reach your dreams and that no matter what stands in your way, you can overcome that.  Kids need a positive role model these days, and I feel that Miss Cherokee is the perfect opportunity to reach out to kids.”

Jackson, 20, is the daughter of Doris Johnson and Bill Jackson, and she is from the Yellowhill Community.  She is also a junior at Mars Hill and is majoring in sports medicine.  Jackson is a member of the Mars Hill Athletic Training Club, the Native American Student Association, and is an athletic trainer for the soccer team.  Her hobbies include learning Cherokee language, basketry, shopping, spending time with family and friends, and attending local events such as Cherokee High School football games.

“As Miss Cherokee, I’d like to get the pageant back to what it used to be a long time ago,” said Jackson.  “I feel like Miss Cherokee is an honor, and I think it needs to be bigger than what it has been in the last few years, and I think girls need a really good role model.”

She further related that she would like to speak to younger girls and adolescent girls and encourage them and help build their confidence so they would feel more comfortable running for pageant titles like Teen Miss Cherokee or Miss Cherokee.

“I think one of the biggest things I’d like to do is to build the pageant up and have girls feel honored and see what a great privilege it is to be in something like this and represent your nation and tribe.”

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