Published On: Wed, Dec 16th, 2009
Sports | By

Cherokee Girls on the Run Team finishes 5k in Asheville

 Submitted by YVETTE RIVERA-COLMANT

CHEROKEE CHOICES

 

 

The Cherokee Girls on the Run team competed in the Girls on the Run of WNC 5K in Asheville on Saturday, Dec. 12.  Shown front row (left-right) Jim Driver, Jimiquah Driver, Adelia Crowe; back row – Tara McCoy, Carla Tolley, and Edith Tolley.  (Photo courtesy of Yvette Rivera-Colmant)

The Cherokee Girls on the Run team competed in the Girls on the Run of WNC 5K in Asheville on Saturday, Dec. 12. Shown front row (left-right) Jim Driver, Jimiquah Driver, Adelia Crowe; back row – Tara McCoy, Carla Tolley, and Edith Tolley. (Photo courtesy of Yvette Rivera-Colmant)

ASHEVILLE It was a blistery cold morning in Asheville for the start of the Girls on the Run 5K race on Saturday, Dec. 12.  Seventeen students, with the support of their Cherokee Choices Mentors, made it out with the intent to finish strong.  They had been working toward this goal since September meeting twice weekly for 14 weeks. 

Cherokee Choice’s mentor Tara McCoy explained, “We provide this program to the girls because it works.  The girls work on running but they also work on being good team members.” 

Aiyanna West, a 3rd grader stated, “I can’t wait to run, I know I’m going to run fast.  When is it going to start?  I’m ready now!”

Jimiqua Driver and her cousin Adelia Crowe ran together as their family cheered them on. Edith Tolley, a girl with nothing will stop me power, just returned from an ankle injury to finish the race with her mother Carla Tolley. Hope Long and her sister Faith ran with Ms. Metz, a 4th grade teacher from Cherokee Elementary School.  T

his team was joined with 1500 runners from WNC Girls on the Run chapters and other local runners.  Every girl that entered the race finished the race. 

Girls on the Run is an internationally recognized non-profit program focused on the development of girls.  The program’s objective is to reduce the potential display of at-risk activities among its participants.  It includes training for a 3.1 mile running event with self-esteem enhancing, uplifting workouts.  Coaches encourage positive emotional, social, mental, and physical development in our participants.

This spring, Cherokee Choices Mentors will continue the Cherokee Elementary Girls on the Run program.  Cherokee Choices is a prevention of diabetes program with funding from CDC and in part by the North Carolina Office of Minority Health. For more information on Girls on the Run, visit the WNC Girls on the Run web site at http://www.gotrwnc.org, or call Yvette Colmant at 497-1978.

 

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